WHY SO AWAKE?

 

Not getting enough sleep is not good for you.

There are many different reasons why you may have trouble sleeping: from physiological causes to simple habits. Remember to talk to your health care professional about what you can do if you have insomnia.

Why So Awake?Why So Awake?

Is sleep hygiene enough?

 

Improving your habits can be helpful, but for some people it may not always be enough to get your sleep back on track.

Is Sleep Hygiene Enough?
Is Sleep Hygiene Enough?

Your brain has a Sleep System and a Wake System

 
Your sleep system helps you sleep, and a wake system keeps you awake. As you age, your neurotransmitters or brain chemical signals may change, which may affect your sleep and wake systems. This could be a cause of insomnia.
Sleep System

Sleep System

The sleep system sends signals that help you fall and stay asleep at night.

Sometimes your sleep system is not able to take over the wake system’s alert state, leaving your brain in an overactive state. This may be what’s causing your insomnia.
 
Wake System

Wake System

When you wake in the morning, your brain sends signals that move it into an alert, or active, state.

This helps you stay awake during the day. If these signals don’t slow down at night, and you stay in an alert state, your brain is believed to be in a position of overactivity.

Insomnia may result if your wake system stays active when it’s time to sleep.

Your brain has a Sleep System and a Wake System

 

Your sleep system helps you sleep, and a wake system keeps you awake. As you age, your neurotransmitters or brain chemical signals may change, which may affect your sleep and wake systems. This could be a cause of insomnia.

Sleep System

Sleep System

The sleep system sends signals that help you fall and stay asleep at night.

Sometimes your sleep system is not able to take over the wake system’s alert state, leaving your brain in an overactive state. This may be what’s causing your insomnia.
 
Wake System

Wake System

When you wake in the morning, your brain sends signals that move it into an alert, or active, state.

This helps you stay awake during the day. If these signals don’t slow down at night, and you stay in an alert state, your brain is believed to be in a position of overactivity.

Insomnia may result if your wake system stays active when it’s time to sleep.

The stages of sleep

 

As you sleep through the night, your body goes through different stages in two parts—Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NREM, or Non-REM (N1-N3) sleep:

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Generally Occurs About 90 Minutes After Falling Asleep
Sleep Stage N1 of Sleep: Brief Transition Period of Light Stage Sleep
Sleep Stage N2: Brain Waves Slow Down in This Stage of Sleep
Sleep Stage N3: It is Harder to be Awoken in This Stage of Sleep
Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Generally Occurs About 90 Minutes After Falling Asleep

REM Stage

Rapid eye movement (REM) generally occurs about 90 minutes after falling asleep, and is the stage in which most dreams occur. Heart rate and blood pressure increase, and the eyes move quickly in different directions.
 
 
Sleep Stage N1 of Sleep: Brief Transition Period of Light Stage Sleep

Stage N1

A relatively brief transition period of light stage sleep. Can be somewhat alert and easily woken.
 
 
Sleep Stage N2: Brain Waves Slow Down in This Stage of Sleep

Stage N2

Brain waves slow down in this stage of sleep.
 
 
Sleep Stage N3: It is Harder to be Awoken in This Stage of Sleep

Stage N3

It is harder to be awoken in this stage of sleep. The body repairs muscle, tissue, and boosts immune function during this phase.
 

Not getting enough sleep in different phases of sleep may result in feeling like sleep was not long enough. Many factors can contribute to disruption of sleep phases, including total sleep time, frequent awakenings, and sleep-wake cycles.

Talk to your health care professional to determine how to best address your insomnia.

Need more answers about insomnia?

Need more answers about
insomnia?
Your Lifestyle Can Affect Your Sleep

Your lifestyle can affect your sleep.

Improving your habits may help you get back to a more regular sleep routine.

If you are struggling with insomnia,

talk to your health care professional.

If you are struggling with insomnia, talk to your health care professional.

Your health care professional can help identify what’s causing your insomnia, potential treatment options, and other ways to take action.

Your health care professional can help identify what’s causing your insomnia, potential treatment options, and other ways to take action.


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