INSOMNIA IS A COMMON SLEEP DISORDER

 

that can make it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep throughout the night.

Insomnia is a Common Sleep DisorderInsomnia is a Common Sleep Disorder

While many people experience insomnia in their lifetime, it is more common in older adults.

 

As people age, the way they sleep changes. For example, many older adults wake more frequently in the night.

Insomnia is More Common in Older Adults

When does a sleep problem become insomnia?

 

Many people know what it feels like to struggle with sleep. This can happen when you travel and get jet lag, or when you're anxious and overwhelmed by life. But when does it become insomnia?

People with insomnia have one or more of the following symptoms at least 3 nights per week:

Difficulty Falling Asleep May Be a Symptom of Insomnia

Difficulty falling asleep

 
Difficulty Staying Asleep May Be a Symptom of Insomnia

Difficulty staying asleep

(waking up during the night)

 
Waking Up Too Early May Be a Symptom of Insomnia

Waking up too early in the morning

 

Insomnia may be present in different situations:

 
Contributing Factor for Insomnia: You Are Going Through Menopause

You are going through menopause

Taking Certain Medications May Be a Contributing Factor for Insomnia

You are taking certain medications

Certain Physical or Mental Health Conditions May Be a Contributing Factor for Insomnia

You have certain physical or mental health conditions

Contributing Factor for Insomnia: You Have a Stressful Life

You have a stressful life

If You are a Shift Worker it May Be a Contributing Factor for Insomnia

You are a shift worker

If You're Struggling With Sleep, There's Some Facts About Insomnia You may not Know.

Don’t sleep on your insomnia.

If you’re struggling with sleep, there’s some facts about insomnia you may not know.

Take this simple true/false quiz to learn more about insomnia.

1 of 4

Insomnia is not a medical condition, it’s caused by things like your lifestyle, aging, and medications you take.

THAT IS FALSE

Although it can be impacted by outside factors, insomnia is a treatable medical condition. It’s important to discuss your particular sleep challenges with your health care professional.

CORRECT

Although it can be impacted by outside factors, insomnia is a treatable medical condition. It’s important to discuss your particular sleep challenges with your health care professional.

Brain activity, how your neurotransmitters function, is thought to play a role in the sleep process.

THAT IS TRUE

Your brain contributes to the sleep process. That's why you can improve your sleep habits (ie, "sleep hygiene") and still be unable to sleep throughout the night.

NOT QUITE

Your brain contributes to the sleep process. That's why you can improve your sleep habits (ie, "sleep hygiene") and still be unable to sleep throughout the night.

Insomnia can go away without treatment.

THAT CAN BE TRUE

Chronic insomnia may not go away without treatment. Insomnia can be a complex health condition, so it is vital to talk to your health care professional about ways to manage your insomnia.

THAT CAN BE TRUE

Chronic insomnia may not go away without treatment. Insomnia can be a complex health condition, so it is vital to talk to your health care professional about ways to manage your insomnia.

Awakening too frequently throughout the night isn't worth discussing with your health care professional.

THAT IS INCORRECT

Insomnia is a complex medical condition. The best thing you can do is talk to your health care professional to learn what you can do.

THAT IS CORRECT

Insomnia is a complex medical condition. The best thing you can do is talk to your health care professional to learn what you can do.

       

YOUR RESULTS

YOUR SLEEP IS IMPORTANT

It might be time to talk to your health care professional about your insomnia. To help, we've created a discussion tool to guide that conversation.

Two major types of insomnia:

Two major types of insomnia:

 

Chronic Insomnia

Insomnia is considered chronic (long-term) if a person has trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at least 3 nights per week, for more than a month. It can have many different causes.

 

Acute Insomnia

Short-term insomnia can be caused by a life event, such as a stressful change in a person's job, receiving bad news, or travel. Symptoms for this condition last for less than a month.

If you are struggling with insomnia, talk to your health care professional.

Your health care professional can help identify what’s causing your insomnia, potential treatment options, and other ways to take action.


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