Exercise - as good for your sleep as it is for your body

If you’re having trouble sleeping at night, the last thing you probably feel like doing the next day is exercising. But exercising could be one key to getting better sleep. Studies looked at how long-term exercise can impact sleep in adults with insomnia. The adults in the study fell asleep faster, slept a bit longer and had better sleep quality than before they started working out, after 4 to 24 weeks of exercising consistently.

Learn how exercise is as good as for your sleep as it is for your body.
So how DOES exercise help you get more and better sleep?
Click the tabs below to find out.
Tap the tabs below to find out.
It helps with your body clock.
Being tired helps.
Exercise can help reduce insomnia by its effects on your body clock.
Exercise can reduce insomnia by its effects on circadian rhythms (body clock). If you exercise in the morning, this may inspire consistency, as well as expose you to a greater amount of morning light – important to restructuring sleep patterns on a daily basis.
Exercise can help reduce insomnia by its effects on your body clock.
Daily exertion may help you get more sleep, just don't do it too close to bedtime.
Daily exertion may help you get more sleep. Just be careful when you do it, since exercising too close to bedtime can make it harder to sleep. If exercise has a tendency to keep you awake, you shouldn’t exercise within six hours of bedtime.
Daily exertion may help you get more sleep, just don't do it too close to bedtime.
You know exercise is good for your sleep, but it’s not always easy to make time for it. What can you do to make sure you can fit it into your day?
Click to expand each section below to learn more.
Tap to expand each section below to learn more.

Scrub the floor, vacuum or do any other chore at a fast enough pace to get your heart rate up. Or do yard work. Raking or mowing the lawn can be great ways to get your workout in – and you have a nice tidy house and/or yard once you’re done.

While you’re watching your favorite shows, try to avoid just sitting. Grab some hand weights, climb onto your stationary bicycle, run in place, do some stretching. Even light exercise helps!

Your pooch will get as much out of a walk as you do. If you don’t have a dog, borrow a high-energy pup and speed walk around the neighborhood.


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